Race Results

WC 2019 Series
Results: OWOM

WC Silokek 
Results: MM, U19M, OM, OW, U23M, U23W

Ibar, Serbia 2019
Results; Video; Photos

EC 2019 Series
Results: R6 Overall; R4 Overall

EC Devil’s Stream
Results; Photos; Video;

EC British Open
Results; Photos

Canada Nationals
Results; Photos: -1-, -2-, -3-. Video H2H.

Pre-WRC, Ziyuan
Results: Men, Women; Photos: Trng, SP/OC, SL, H2H, DR; Videos: D1, D2, D3, D4;

ERC Vrbas, Bosnia
Results and media

EC Results so far
R6: OM; OW. R4: OM; OW.

EC Trnavka
Results: Sprint; Slalom. Photos.

WRC 2019, Tully
Results, Photos, press releases, etc

EC Wildalpen
Results: OM, U23M, OW; Photos

EC Priboj, Serbia
Results; Photos

EC Nottingham
Results, Photos: -1-, -2-, -3-. H2H Video

EC Romania, Dracula Race
Results; Photos

WRC 2018
All results

more archived Race Results

A Boater’s Guide to Carabiners

A Boater's Guide to Carabiners

Carabiners

Carabiners are not only an essential rescue tool on the water, but one of a boater’s most versatile pieces of equipment. From unwrapping boats to attaching equipment to hanging a hammock boaters keep several of these at had at all times. In this article, we are going to break down why carabiners are important as well as some tips on how and what to select. If you are trying to understand what is out on the market we have a helpful buyer’s guide at the bottom of the page otherwise you can find more info about carabiners below.

Carabiners are such an ubiquitous and important fundamental of boating life, unfortunately in the boating world we spend far too little time discussing their use and implementation. Many boaters climb as well and it is important to note that although rope work, anchors, fundamentals of force, and implementation of equipment has many parallels; applying every principal of climbing to boating paints an inaccurate picture of what the focus is on the water.

Parts of a Carabiner

Parts of a Carabiner
Satan's Carabiner

Satan’s Carabiner

Carabiner Gate

This makes the whole system work. There are 2 major styles of carabiner gates locking and non-locking. There are a couple major styles of non-locking carabiners; wire gate and solid gate.

Unlike carabiners for climbing where non locking gates are often used, in boating a non-locking carabiner is the devil.

Given the number of impacts that occur on the river, the constantly shifting gear, and sometimes flying people; there is no place on a boat for a non-locking demon carabiner. The potential to fly into a carabiner during a surf or a flip, then getting your PFD caught in it, only to hold you underwater, or against a rock is just too much of a risk.

Having a non-locking carabiner is worrisome enough, however most boaters tend to store carabiners within easy reach or on the lapel of their PFD during use. Both scenarios at all violate the clean principal and can put people at risk as well as turn a rescuer into a victim.

Locking carabiners are more safe, effective, and common among boaters. There are 2 major styles of locking carabiner that are available (they go by many names): manual locking and auto locking. Continue reading A Boater’s Guide to Carabiners …

#AreYouReady #RaftersAreAwesome #guide #raft #rafting #raftguide #whitewater #StrongerTogether #internationalrafting #RiverFamily #WeAreIRF

DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.

ATTA’s 10 Recovery, Health and Safety Recommendations for Adventure Travel

Gustavo Timo of the Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA) feels that “Covid-19 brings unprecedented challenges to the tourism industry and that means the Adventure Travel sector as well. However, Adventure Travel might be better equipped to recover and reboot faster simply because of the DNA of the experiences we offer – small groups, nature-based, and set in rural environments and communities. Our industry is resilient and serves a more intrepid traveler that might be willing to come back to travel before others. But no matter what, we need to adjust and adapt to the new normal.”

So what is it that the adventure travel sector can do to turn this lemon into a lemonade? The ATTA pulled a team of experts together, who, in collaboration with the ATTA global community prepared the topics below.

“They are a set of recommendations that reflect the role of Adventure Travel in promoting the health and safety of our teams, travelers, and the communities we visit.” says the ATTA team.

1. Reassess your market, consider all the options. Covid-19 has severely impacted society in many different ways. You need to check how your market has been affected and consider other opportunities. We suggest the following approach: local, regional, domestic, international short haul, international long haul.

Continue reading 10 Recovery, Health and Safety Recommendations for Adventure Travel from ATTA.

#RaftersAreAwesome #AreYouReady #strongertogether #ATTA

DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.

Saving tourism in unprecedented and challenging times

In these testing times we find ourselves and our loved ones in situations we would likely never have considered. Many of us in the rafting industry are under increasing pressure with not just personal situations but tourist operations and employees affected by lockdowns and vast swathes of people cancelling their holidays and travel plans. It’s times like these that we need to come together as the #RaftingFamily and continue to support the rafting and tourism communities.

Many adventure tourism businesses are looking at bleak seasons ahead, if you have or had plans to travel and take part in tourist activities, or own a tourism business here’s a list of some ideas to consider: Continue reading Saving tourism in unprecedented and challenging times

Rafting Magazines Gear Shed – Arch Rival Drysuit

Article by Nick Prete

  • Shell Fabric: 3-layer waterproof/breathable shell with 100% nylon taslan face fabric treated with C6 DWR (durable water repellent) finish

  • Fabric Weight: 181g/m²

  • Waterproofness (mm h₂o): 30,000

  • Breathability (g/m²/24h): 4000

  • Front YKK® AquaSeal® entry and releif zipper

  • Seat and Knees reinforced with abrasion resistant Devil’s Club nylon taslan 3-layer 240g/m² fabric

  • Latex neck and wrist gaskets with neoprene over cuffs to aid in dryness and gasket preservation

  • Adjustable webbing belt to keep your suit snuggly on your hips

  • Low maintenance latex socks

  • Weight: 3.9lbs (62.4oz)

  • Retail Price: $949.00

Arch Rival Drysuit Review

As I unrolled the Immersion Research Arch Rival Drysuit at the put-in for Slab-Creek I wasn’t sad about putting away my old drysuit. For the last few years it had been more of a damp suit with replaced gaskets, microholes and general leakiness. I had stretched that thing to, and past, the end of its usefulness and was ready to end the day with dry underlayers.

So I was stoked to try out the new Arch Rival. I hadn’t used any gear from IR previously but had heard good things from kayaker friends who had. Could this kayaking brand make a drysuit that performs well for rafters too?

Watershed 1.jpg

Turns out, this mid-priced drysuit would live up to my expectations. The first thing that struck me was how light it was. The 3-layer nylon Taslan fabric is lighter than any drysuit I had previously used. If you wear your drysuit often, the lightness and comfortability is a big plus. Also for all you instagrammers, it looks damn good. The cut was much more form fitting and the fabric color layouts makes it the coolest looking drysuit for that price.

Ideal Conditions for the Arch Rival Drysuit

This drysuit is not extremely thick, but it can stand up in the colder conditions while also performing on warmer days. I’ve worn it in both frigid temps and without any underlayers on more temperate days. This drysuit can handle just about everything.

Continue reading Rafting Magazines Gear Shed – Arch Rival Drysuit

DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.

8 Things to Ask a Rafting Company Before You Book

8 Things to Ask a Rafting Company Before You Book

Getting the most out of your next river rafting trip

How many miles is the trip?

An average commercial rafting trip will be between 8 and 15 miles for a day trip. In general the tougher the river the shorter the trip. Some commercial outfitters on particularly tough rivers may only offer a few miles, but Outfitters run all kinds of trips on all sorts of rivers, but some outfitters try to gain advantage over each other by offering more miles. Getting more for your money sounds great, but you’re not buying bus tour. Remember, rafting is a physical workout. Like running marathons? Because that’s what a 21 mile trip is going to feel like. Focus on the river trip as a whole not just the number of miles.

On average, how many hours is the trip?

2017-08-BestUbaye (43 of 61).jpg

More important than miles is time on the water. How many hours will you be on the river on average? An 8 mile class III trip can be on the water 1.5 hours or 4 hours. If the river is rated class IV or class V that couple of miles may take all day so they can have extra time to get you down the river in case anything happens. The length of time that you spend on the river is directly related to how much paddling that your guide will make you do. Less time often means your vacation will end up being more work than fun. This all ties into our next point.

Do you have a set take out time?

“Professional” Guides often feel like they are in a race to get down the river. They think that takeout is a time not a place. If the outfitter that you are thinking of using has a set takeout time that is typically a sign the company has lots of arbitrary rules in place for their guides or have a lot of people packed on one date. Continue reading 8 Things to Ask a Rafting Company Before You Book …


DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.

#AreYouReady #RaftersAreAwesome #guide #raft #rafting #raftguide #whitewater #StrongerTogether #internationalrafting #RiverFamily #WeAreIRF

Top 10 rafting spots in California

If you are a thrill-seeking nature lover, then there are tons of whitewater rafting spots in California that will give you the best experience.

California is heaven for those who love the waters. There are tons of watersports you can enjoy in the area, from surfing, windsurfing, jetskiing, to kayaking, among others. If you want to experience the thrilling adventure of rapids, there is a lot of that in California too.

Whitewater Rafting Spots in California

A day whitewater rafting in the impressive rapids in California is a must-have experience for an active and stimulating vacation, especially in the summer. It wouldn’t be an experience you will easily forget.

If you are looking for the best whitewater rafting spots in California, here are ten of the most impressive destinations that should be on your list. Continue reading Top 10 rafting spots in California

4 Types of Guides You Will Meet Rafting

Hopefully you did your homework with the outfitter and selected an outfitter that actually lets you have fun rather than the cattle-car of a raft trip that you could buy on a daily deal site. This is the first step to having a good trip and you can find out more about outfitter selection in our 8 things to ask a rafting company article. Next you want to understand who your guide is.

The Trip Leader

First you want to know if you are in the Trip Leader’s boat. The Trip Leader is generally the most experienced full time guide on the trip, but this is not always a good thing for you unless you are rafting with the kids or grandma. Since the Trip Leader is responsible for almost every aspect of the trip including every guest, there is a really low chance that this person will be able to relax enough to let you play on the river. While you are having fun jumping off rocks and swimming rapids, the Trip Leader is watching the flock like an overprotective shepherd. Luckily unless you are a group of hot girls, weak-looking paddlers, or rich-looking people, odds are you probably won’t be in the Trip Leader’s boat. Trip Leaders tend to cherry pick their crews since they are the ones who get to assign them. The good Trip Leaders (like the one pictured above) pick up the slack for the other guides, while the bad ones pick the crews that are most likely to tip or get them laid.

The Professional Staff Guide

The Professional Staff Guide is the core of the guide crew they work commercially sometimes 7 days a week throughout the summer and usually 3-5 days a week in the shoulder season. Typically these guides also do one of three things in the winter: travel, work at a ski resort, or work at another rafting company on the other side of the world. The good news is that Continue reading 4 Types of Guides You Will Meet Rafting ….

DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.

#AreYouReady #RaftersAreAwesome #guide #raft #rafting #raftguide #whitewater #StrongerTogether #internationalrafting #RiverFamily #WeAreIRF

Should We Be Classifying Rafts?

This article is a reprint from our friends at ‘RAFTING MAGAZINE’

Kayaking has taken an interesting trend over the years by classifying boats. Given the crossover of many paddlers between these sports it is surprising that rafting hasn’t picked up the stratification of boat classes into broad categories. As we get more experienced with a topic we require greater degrees of specificity to describe similar yet functionally different concepts. So, we thought we would take a crack at some boat classification for rafts.

How does classifying rafts help?

We get a ton of questions about what boat to take out in which river. Different boats have very different performance characteristics. Everyone has their preference for style of boat and different regions will see greater popularity from different designs due to local conditions.

One of the more particular parts of our industry is that boat design and popularity varies regionally since rivers in different geological zones are slightly different despite the fact that water tends to create similarly predictable features in general. A good thing to pay particular attention to is how the locals boat and customize their boats.

Raft classifications

It’s important to note that not every raft fits perfectly in each category. While you can certainly get down a big water section of river in a play boat, it may not be the most enjoyable experience as something like that can leave you pretty exposed. Here are our thoughts on how to categorize rafts generally. You can click the links below to take you to the gear shed to see more about what’s out there on the market.

Boats.jpg
  • Play boats

  • Creek Boats

  • River Runners

  • Big water boats

  • Gear boats

Outside of these categories there are a few specialty categories that we haven’t covered like J-rigs and sweep boats as they tend to be less common, especially for the average boater. Also we are not covering catarafts in this piece as we would like to cover those crafts in a separate article.

Continue reading Should We Classify Rafts?

DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.

The Great Karnali Quest – 242 kms of epic Downriver racing!

Karnali, the longest river in Nepal, is recognized as world class for whitewater rafting and is still the last free flowing river in Nepal. It originates from the base of mount Kailash, flowing across the beautiful landscape of Nepal before dispersing into the Ganges River.

The Great Karnali Quest- sacred downriver raft race (probably the longest downriver raft race in the world) will be an incredible experience of a lifetime. It would be 242 km of raft racing in the most pristine Himalayan river. This event aims to promote the Karnali Region as a wonderful destination for Eco-adventure tourism. The Great Karnali Quest is not only about the rafting challenge, it’s a campaign to raise awareness amongst the global community to conserve the natural rivers before they are destroyed.

Continue reading The Great Karnali Quest – 242 kms of epic Downriver racing!

Balkan White Water Safety Summit

The Rafting Federation of the Republic of Srpska (Rafting savez Republike Srpske) are proud to announce the first ever whitewater safety conference aimed specifically at the Balkan region. The Balkan White Water Safety Summit will be held in the City of Banja Luka from 18 to 22 May 2020, with a workshop being run on the Vrbas River at the start.
The aims of the conference are to:
  • Promote rafting standards in the Balkan region
  • Unify the rafting industry in the Balkan region
  • Improve the safety on rivers and what the benefits of safe rafting are
  • Cooperation between rafting companies on Balkan
  • Look at floods in the Balkan region and what the role of educated rafting guides in this can be
  • Promotion of the 2021 World Rafting Championship in BiH
Program:
  • 18 – 21 May 2020 – IRF Guide and Trip Leader Workshop on the Vrbas River.
  • 22 May 2020  – Conference in the City of Banja Luka (all day)
    • 10:00  Official opening and speakers (Ministries, IRF and Mayors)
    • 10:30 – 11:00 Presentation of BiH’s WRC 2021
    • 11:00 – 11:45 IRF standards and safety on river
    • 11:45 – 12:00 Open discussion
    • 12:00 – 12:30 Break
    • 12:30 – 13:00 ATTA and outdoor industry standards
    • 13:00 – 14:00 IRF standards and the rafting law in Balkan countries
    • 14:00 – 17:00 Different Workshops – more details soon
    • 17:30 Conclusion

Invitations will be extended to all those who are interested in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia, Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia, Macedonia, Albania, Bulgaria and Romania. Interested persons are very welcome from regions outside of these regions. Invitations will be extended to key persons in the Ministry of Sport RS and BiH, Ministry of Tourism RS and BiH and Mayors of the City Banja Luka and Foca, as well as companies and authorities from Neretva and Una Rivers, plus the touris boards of all these cities.

Keep an eye on the following website for updates: raftingsavezsrpske.com/balkanconference