Race Results

WC 2019 Series
Results: OWOM

WC Silokek 
Results: MM, U19M, OM, OW, U23M, U23W

Ibar, Serbia 2019
Results; Video; Photos

EC 2019 Series
Results: R6 Overall; R4 Overall

EC Devil’s Stream
Results; Photos; Video;

EC British Open
Results; Photos

Canada Nationals
Results; Photos: -1-, -2-, -3-. Video H2H.

Pre-WRC, Ziyuan
Results: Men, Women; Photos: Trng, SP/OC, SL, H2H, DR; Videos: D1, D2, D3, D4;

ERC Vrbas, Bosnia
Results and media

EC Results so far
R6: OM; OW. R4: OM; OW.

EC Trnavka
Results: Sprint; Slalom. Photos.

WRC 2019, Tully
Results, Photos, press releases, etc

EC Wildalpen
Results: OM, U23M, OW; Photos

EC Priboj, Serbia
Results; Photos

EC Nottingham
Results, Photos: -1-, -2-, -3-. H2H Video

EC Romania, Dracula Race
Results; Photos

WRC 2018
All results

more archived Race Results

A Boater’s Guide to Carabiners

A Boater's Guide to Carabiners

Carabiners

Carabiners are not only an essential rescue tool on the water, but one of a boater’s most versatile pieces of equipment. From unwrapping boats to attaching equipment to hanging a hammock boaters keep several of these at had at all times. In this article, we are going to break down why carabiners are important as well as some tips on how and what to select. If you are trying to understand what is out on the market we have a helpful buyer’s guide at the bottom of the page otherwise you can find more info about carabiners below.

Carabiners are such an ubiquitous and important fundamental of boating life, unfortunately in the boating world we spend far too little time discussing their use and implementation. Many boaters climb as well and it is important to note that although rope work, anchors, fundamentals of force, and implementation of equipment has many parallels; applying every principal of climbing to boating paints an inaccurate picture of what the focus is on the water.

Parts of a Carabiner

Parts of a Carabiner
Satan's Carabiner

Satan’s Carabiner

Carabiner Gate

This makes the whole system work. There are 2 major styles of carabiner gates locking and non-locking. There are a couple major styles of non-locking carabiners; wire gate and solid gate.

Unlike carabiners for climbing where non locking gates are often used, in boating a non-locking carabiner is the devil.

Given the number of impacts that occur on the river, the constantly shifting gear, and sometimes flying people; there is no place on a boat for a non-locking demon carabiner. The potential to fly into a carabiner during a surf or a flip, then getting your PFD caught in it, only to hold you underwater, or against a rock is just too much of a risk.

Having a non-locking carabiner is worrisome enough, however most boaters tend to store carabiners within easy reach or on the lapel of their PFD during use. Both scenarios at all violate the clean principal and can put people at risk as well as turn a rescuer into a victim.

Locking carabiners are more safe, effective, and common among boaters. There are 2 major styles of locking carabiner that are available (they go by many names): manual locking and auto locking. Continue reading A Boater’s Guide to Carabiners …

#AreYouReady #RaftersAreAwesome #guide #raft #rafting #raftguide #whitewater #StrongerTogether #internationalrafting #RiverFamily #WeAreIRF

DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.

Advice on IRF guide training workshops as COVID-19 restrictions are eased

Over the past week several countries have started lifting COVID-19 stay at home orders and other restrictions in a phased way even though the pandemic is far from being over. Re-openings are taking place due to various reasons, while health experts warn that the virus will likely continue to be a health risk for many months or years.

IRF Guide Training and Education (GTE) Instructors are looking at resuming GTE guide workshops in some of these areas, and so the GTE Committee is developing an action plan for minimising the spread of COVID-19 as part of the overall GTE policy.  As a general policy, the IRF always puts the health and safety of our employees, athletes, instructors, volunteers and event participants above all other considerations.

In the interim, before a specific COVID-19 policy for GTE workshops is codified, several GTE Assessors have offered advice on conducting workshops during these difficult times.  This advice is for informational purposes only and is not offered as official advice by the IRF, nor intended to supersede potential conflicting advice from any codified IRF policy, nor the advice and instructions of local and international health authorities: Continue reading Advice on IRF guide training workshops as COVID-19 restrictions are eased

IRF GTE Instructor update in Costa Rica this September

You might be good at setting up mechanical advantages, but how do you teach someone else to do it?

The IRF GTE will be holding an Instructor update 30th September – 2nd October 2020 for all existing IRF instructors who are able to travel to attend the update on the Sarapiqui river in Costa Rica.

The aim of the update is for IRF instructors to share current global best practice within the rafting industry. The update will also give the instructors the opportunity to update their knowledge of the IRF GTE system & standards.

The update is free to join for all existing IRF instructors. Any donations to cover the expenses of the workshop will be highly appreciated.  The update will be hosted by Sarapiqui Adventures & IRF GTE assessor Mark Hirst. The update will consist of both theoretical & practical water based sessions.

More details here.

Attendees of the IRF Instructor Workshop in Costa Rica 2019

Bookings:
Non Costa Rica  based instructors: mark.hirst@internationalrafting.com
Costa Rica based instructors: info@aventurayremocostarica.com

 

#AreYouReady #RaftersAreAwesome #guide #raft #rafting #raftguide #whitewater #StrongerTogether #RiverFamily #WeAreIRF

Rafting Magazines Gear Shed – Arch Rival Drysuit

Article by Nick Prete

  • Shell Fabric: 3-layer waterproof/breathable shell with 100% nylon taslan face fabric treated with C6 DWR (durable water repellent) finish

  • Fabric Weight: 181g/m²

  • Waterproofness (mm h₂o): 30,000

  • Breathability (g/m²/24h): 4000

  • Front YKK® AquaSeal® entry and releif zipper

  • Seat and Knees reinforced with abrasion resistant Devil’s Club nylon taslan 3-layer 240g/m² fabric

  • Latex neck and wrist gaskets with neoprene over cuffs to aid in dryness and gasket preservation

  • Adjustable webbing belt to keep your suit snuggly on your hips

  • Low maintenance latex socks

  • Weight: 3.9lbs (62.4oz)

  • Retail Price: $949.00

Arch Rival Drysuit Review

As I unrolled the Immersion Research Arch Rival Drysuit at the put-in for Slab-Creek I wasn’t sad about putting away my old drysuit. For the last few years it had been more of a damp suit with replaced gaskets, microholes and general leakiness. I had stretched that thing to, and past, the end of its usefulness and was ready to end the day with dry underlayers.

So I was stoked to try out the new Arch Rival. I hadn’t used any gear from IR previously but had heard good things from kayaker friends who had. Could this kayaking brand make a drysuit that performs well for rafters too?

Watershed 1.jpg

Turns out, this mid-priced drysuit would live up to my expectations. The first thing that struck me was how light it was. The 3-layer nylon Taslan fabric is lighter than any drysuit I had previously used. If you wear your drysuit often, the lightness and comfortability is a big plus. Also for all you instagrammers, it looks damn good. The cut was much more form fitting and the fabric color layouts makes it the coolest looking drysuit for that price.

Ideal Conditions for the Arch Rival Drysuit

This drysuit is not extremely thick, but it can stand up in the colder conditions while also performing on warmer days. I’ve worn it in both frigid temps and without any underlayers on more temperate days. This drysuit can handle just about everything.

Continue reading Rafting Magazines Gear Shed – Arch Rival Drysuit

DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.

Reviewed, refreshed and renewed – IRF GTE Instructor resources

Reviewed, refreshed and renewed – IRF Instructor documentation and resources (in English and now also in Spanish)

There is now a wealth of resources that the IRF provides to our certified Instructors and Assessors which are all aimed at assisting them to simplify the processes, administration and implementation of assessing Guides, Trip Leaders and Instructors.

The updated and new documentation includes:

  • IRF GTE Award System – the overarching document the system is based on
  • Assessment Guidelines for Workshops – setting out what and how Instructors / Assessors are to assess for each certification
  • A detailed letter for all Instructors and Assessors explaining the administration processes of the IRF GTE System so that it is clear how it works and can be referred to at any time
  • A template to create a PDF or poster to advertise courses / workshops
  • A standard letter Instructors can adjust and send to candidates before they attend their workshops so as to ensure the candidate knows what to expect, what to bring, and how the IRF GTE System works
  • Templates for recording the strengths and weaknesses of each candidate, whether they are being assessed as a Guide, Trip Leader, Safety Kayaker, Safety Rafter, Site Specific or Instructor certificate
  • A throwbag test to use during assessments
  • The minimum content for an IRF GTE compliant Guide Training Program
  • The IRF GTE award level overview as a Power Point presentation, or as a flow chart
  • Guide’s log sheets for recording their rafting trips – in pdf format and in excel format
  • CLAP = Communication, Line of Sight, Avoidance and Positioning and is a tactic used to have a structured river running best practise. This is in a Power Point version, Word doc version and a printable pdf version
  • IRF Youtube videos on common knots including hitches and prusiks

IRF Instructors and Assessors are continually working to add to the resources available – we thank all those who have translated documents in to other languages, who offer us their instructional videos, and who continually assist us in improving the IRF GTE System in general.

IRF Instructor resources are available on a password protected page on the IRF website. Certified Instructors and Assessors can request access: gte@internationalrafting,com

#RaftersAreAwesome #AreYouReady #internationalrafting

4 Types of Guides You Will Meet Rafting

Hopefully you did your homework with the outfitter and selected an outfitter that actually lets you have fun rather than the cattle-car of a raft trip that you could buy on a daily deal site. This is the first step to having a good trip and you can find out more about outfitter selection in our 8 things to ask a rafting company article. Next you want to understand who your guide is.

The Trip Leader

First you want to know if you are in the Trip Leader’s boat. The Trip Leader is generally the most experienced full time guide on the trip, but this is not always a good thing for you unless you are rafting with the kids or grandma. Since the Trip Leader is responsible for almost every aspect of the trip including every guest, there is a really low chance that this person will be able to relax enough to let you play on the river. While you are having fun jumping off rocks and swimming rapids, the Trip Leader is watching the flock like an overprotective shepherd. Luckily unless you are a group of hot girls, weak-looking paddlers, or rich-looking people, odds are you probably won’t be in the Trip Leader’s boat. Trip Leaders tend to cherry pick their crews since they are the ones who get to assign them. The good Trip Leaders (like the one pictured above) pick up the slack for the other guides, while the bad ones pick the crews that are most likely to tip or get them laid.

The Professional Staff Guide

The Professional Staff Guide is the core of the guide crew they work commercially sometimes 7 days a week throughout the summer and usually 3-5 days a week in the shoulder season. Typically these guides also do one of three things in the winter: travel, work at a ski resort, or work at another rafting company on the other side of the world. The good news is that Continue reading 4 Types of Guides You Will Meet Rafting ….

DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.

#AreYouReady #RaftersAreAwesome #guide #raft #rafting #raftguide #whitewater #StrongerTogether #internationalrafting #RiverFamily #WeAreIRF

The principle of SMILE

By Mark Hirst of Lapin Koskikoulu

The principle of Smile & the big 3

During this brief post I wanted to share the tips I use to reduce the chances of my raft customers panicking during a swim.
I am getting on a bit now, I will be 43 this year! I first went kayaking when I was in primary school in my home city of Manchester in the UK. As most school kids one of the first things we were taught is that if we go upside down when the kayak capsizes is “TRY NOT TO PANIC”. Yeah right I know, sit upside down in plastic lunchbox in cold dark water that is around 10 degrees C in an oxygen poor environment wearing nothing more than a thin long john wetsuit with no dry top and try not to panic! Dream on – I don’t have wide shoulders for that!!
I eventually overcame the urge to panic and as the years passed by I found myself pleading with my guests not to panic when, as a result of my poor guiding skills, I would inevitably flip sending all of my customers for a swim. I am sure many raft guides will agree with me there is the twinge of guilt you feel when you see a customer panicking in the water as a result of a mistake made by yourself.
In 2007 I was lucky to work with a team of exceptional guides in Iceland on a demanding river that has a habit of making people (guides included) panic during a swim. Most of the guides quickly realised that panicking customers is bad for business for the following reasons:
  • Panicking creates added stress for all concerned parties, customers and guides, in a potentially stressful environment.
  • A panicking customer is not likely to return or become an advocate for your trips.
  • In the dawn of TripAdvisor and social media bad reviews are not good for business.
As a team of guides we asked “what can we do to stop our guests from panicking when they swim?”. Step forward Mr Chris from Canada. In a moment of clarity Chris said “Instead of telling the customers what we do not want them to do, lets tell them what we want them to do”. Bingo I thought!

Continue reading The principle of SMILE

Rafting Operator Accreditation (ROA) – what is it?

The IRF has for many years discussed the merits of developing an accreditation for operators that offer whitewater rafting guided or instructional services. Simply put, this process would provide a means of recognizing operators that meet or exceed internationally accepted safety and quality standards. In September 2019, a committee was created to address this need and draft an accreditation program for the IRF Board approval. The Rafting Operator Accreditation (ROA) Committee has now achieved this stage and is ready for input from stakeholders.

Throughout early 2020, the ROA Committee will be interviewing leading rafting companies around the world to gather feedback on the ROA draft. So far, 20 operators from 18 countries have been invited to participate in the interview. Their responses will be themed, and the findings will inform the review of the ROA draft.

The ROA will be launched in Costa Rica in the fall of 2020 with a selected group of companies going through a pilot test. Following the pilot tests, we will make final adjustments to the process before we make the ROA available internationally.

Continue reading Rafting Operator Accreditation (ROA) – what is it?

IRF’s GTE System upgrades make it cheaper

The IRF Guide Training & Education (GTE) System has recently had its cost structure, certification and card issuing process overhauled

In the days before social distancing – GTE course in Romania

In this time of so much bad news we’d like to bring you some good news. The cost of IRF GTE certifications has reduced!

The system has been simplified so that guides get their cards and certificates much faster. From now on each person who has completed the certification process will be sent, by GTE Admin, a certificate combined with a card. This will allow those who need cards or certificates to present to employers or put up on walls as proof of certification to have them sooner.

The really good news is that by simplifying the process we can reduce the fees we are charging by US$20! So the new fees will be (and remember, this is for a 3 year period!):

  • Guide Assessment fee – US$40.00
  • Trip Leader Assessment fee – US$70.00
  • Instructor Assessment fee – US$130.00

Renewals for Guides and Trip Leaders, however, will go up by US$5 to US$30, but they will receive their personalised certificate/card immediately when they complete the renewal requirements.

Where guides have multiple assessments at one time they are to be charged the higher fee for their assessment plus US$15 for the second qualification. For example: Raft Guide with Safety Kayaker – US$40 plus US$15 = US$55.

This change-over came into effect from 1 Feb 2020.

The hope is that reducing the certification fee will make it even more accessible by many around the world, especially  in developing countries where the need to increase river running and safety standards is paramount so as to ensure the health and sustainability of the rafting tourism industry.

#RaftersAreAwesome #AreYouReady #StrongerTogether #RiverFamily #WeAreIRF

Ropes for River Use

In this article Rafting Magazine takes a look at rope used for rafting specifically static line. For this article they reached out to both Sterling and BlueWater ropes to get some technical insight on what works best for river rescue use. There is a lot to know and a lot to understand about what rafters need on the river. If you are looking for throw ropes or throw bags you can find more info on that here. They also will be bringing you some of the top contenders for best ropes on the market.

Ropes are a pretty complex topic in the river community. Both static and dynamic ropes find their way into our gear. It’s Important to know what they are and when to use them if you are unfamiliar with the purpose of each type of rope. Another important piece of terminology is what the difference between rope and line is.

What is the Difference Between Rope vs. Line?

A rope is a rope right? Not exactly, as we increase our mastery over a topic, it requires greater degrees of specificity to accurately describe and understand the topic. So the best way to understand this is: a rope is a rope, unless it’s on a boat, then it’s a line. Throw ropes are used on shore, perimeter lines ring a raft, static lines pull a raft off of a wrap, flip lines (which generally aren’t even rope) flip the boat over, but a strap secures gear to the boat. Like any sport as the community has gained mastery we have borrowed some terms from sailing, kayaking, and oceanic navigation, as well as sprinkling in some other terms of our own. So a rope is a rope, until it’s not a rope, but does that make all rope equal?

Static Rope in Rafting

Now that we understand the difference between rope and line it is important to note that not all rope is equal or the same in rafting. There are two main uses for Static line in rafting: perimeter lines and static lines for rescue applications. When rigging perimeter lines some folks prefer ropes and some prefer webbing, largely it is a matter of preference, however Continue reading Ropes for River Use

DISCLAIMER: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, viewpoints or official policies of the IRF.